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Which Car was James Bond’s Best Ride?

8 Sep , 2015  

While James Bond may be famous for his charming character, his license to kill and his drink of choice – a Martini shaken not stirred – for many Bond fans it’s his love of cars that is the most interesting part of his appeal. Both modern and classic cars play pivotal roles in many Bond movies and he has driven everything from an Aston Martin DB5 to Lotus Esprit.

The new James Bond film Spectre is due to be released later this year and is a highly anticipated addition to the Bond franchise. In response to the eagerly awaited release of Spectre, Ladbrokes has put together some interesting research in a bid to find Bond’s greatest ever car

 

Rolls Royce Silver Cloud II – A View to a Kill (1985)

Rolls Royce Silver Cloud 1 and 2 - carwitter

The 1962 Silver Cloud II featured in the 1985 film A View to a Kill and was driven by Sir Godfrey Tibbett, who was an MI6 agent who posed as a chauffeur for Bond. This classic Rolls Royce unfortunately doesn’t have a happy ending, as it ends up at the bottom of a lake with Bond and Tibbett trapped inside but our hero manages to escape by breathing air from the tyres until he resurfaces. Interestingly, a different car was used in the lake scenes rather than a Silver Cloud, as it was deemed to be a more affordable option.

 

Aston Martin DB5 – GoldenEye (1995) and Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

James Bond - Aston Martin - Skyfall DB5 - carwitter

The Aston Martin DB5 is so good that it has featured in many James Bond films – making it a worthy car for the title of being the best Bond car ever to grace the big screen. The DB5 was Pierce Brosnan’s car in his debut as Bond in the 1995 film Goldeneye and after it gets into a high-speed race with a Ferrari Spider 355, it of course, comes out on top thanks to Bond’s prowess behind the wheel.

It then appears again in Tomorrow Never Dies and its classic curves make this one of Bond’s most attractive cars. The DB5 is the quintessential Bond car and also featured in Goldfinger and Thunderball as well as Casino Royale and Skyfall.

 

BMW Z3 – GoldenEye (1995)

BMW Z3 1.9 Roadster - Carwitter

The BMW Z3 was another one of Bond’s cars of choice in Goldeneye and this was the first movie that saw everyone’s favourite spy at the helm of a Beamer. It came fully equipped with an ejector seat managed by Q and stinger missiles that were housed secretly behind the headlights.

When Bond hands the keys for this attractive modern BMW Z3 over to CIA agent Jack Wade, he gives Wade a warning not to touch the buttons as this is not a car to be played around with. BMW enjoyed a boost in sales after its silver screen appearance and the make of car then featured in the following two Bond films before Aston Martin regained its position as the number one car of choice.

 

Ford Mustang – Diamonds are Forever (1971)

Ford Mustang Mach 1 1971 - carwitter

The Mustang Mach 1 featured in the 1971 hit movie Diamonds are Forever, which is most famous for its amazing car chase scene. Bond (Sean Connery) soon finds himself being chased down by a local sheriff while driving a Mustang and this results in an amazing car chase that takes place on the Las Vegas strip.

The manoeuvres are impressive and Bond even impressively coerces six police cars to crash into each other leading to his successful escape by flying over a ramp at an impressively high speed – eventually Bond is also seen navigating the classic Mustang through a narrow walkway. Hard-core Bond fans will know that all of the cars used in the notorious car chases in this movie were in fact Ford’s. Ford agreed to supply producers with as many cars as they needed as long as Bond drove a Mustang. And drove it he certainly did!

Bond has had so many amazing cars throughout the history that it is impossible to choose just one to take the title as the best Bond car ever.

 

 

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